VirtualBox

Changes between Version 8 and Version 9 of MouseInput


Ignore:
Timestamp:
10/26/2017 06:20:23 AM (7 weeks ago)
Author:
michael
Comment:

--

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
Modified
  • MouseInput

    v8 v9  
    2323=== Virtual devices === #Devices 
    2424 
    25 When a guest operating system is run in a !VirtualBox virtual machine it sees that it is running on a machine with a number of devices present.  This will usually include (simulated) input devices, and we are interested in the emulated PS/2 mouse, the emulated USB mouse and graphics tablet and the Guest Additions pointer device. 
     25When a guest operating system is run in a !VirtualBox virtual machine it sees that it is running on a machine with a number of devices present.  This will usually include (simulated) input devices, and we are interested in the emulated PS/2 mouse, the emulated USB mouse and graphics tablet and the Guest Additions pointer device.  When you enable logging for pointer events, it is useful to set the environment variable RT_RELEASE_LOG_FLAGS=time to print the time of all events.  This helps you match information in the guest and in the host. 
    2626 
    2727 * The first of these is the most basic method of mouse input into the guest system and simulates a traditional pre-USB mouse.  It can provide information about mouse movement to the left, right, up and down (no exact positions), up to five mouse buttons and horizontal and vertical wheel scrolling.  The guest operating system has a standard driver which works with this device.  To see what information Main is sending to this device, run !VirtualBox with the environment variable "VBOX_RELEASE_LOG=+dev_kbd.e.l3.f" set and look in the virtual machine's log file. 
     
    3434 
    3535It is also worth using any tools available in guest operating systems to find out what mouse information they are seeing at the end of the chain.  In guests running the X Window system (Linux, Solaris, FreeBSD), the "xev" command line tool is useful for this and the file "/var/log/Xorg.0.log" and its variants also provide useful inforamation.  In many you can also get information through the "xinput" command line tool.  On many Linux systems the "evtest" command line tool is also useful.  Examples: 
    36  * If a Linux guest running X11 or Wayland is not responding to clicks, use the keyboard to start xev and see if it is reporting mouse movement events at all, and if so if it is reporting clicks. 
     36 * If a Linux guest to clicks, use the keyboard to start xev and see if it is reporting mouse movement events at all, and if so if it is reporting clicks. 
     37 * If the pointer position is wrong inside a Linux guest, compare what xev reports and what the host log file does.  Move the pointer then leave it in one place for a while to make it easy to match the two sets of logging (both will show a time period without events). 
    3738 
    3839Suggestions for Windows guests are welcome! 

www.oracle.com
ContactPrivacy policyTerms of Use