[vbox-dev] [PATCH] user_Introduction.xml: grammar, spelling, fonts, etc.

Michael Thayer michael.thayer at oracle.com
Tue Feb 26 10:49:19 UTC 2019


Passed this on.

Thank you.
Regards
Michael

16.01.19 23:16, Robert P. J. Day wrote:
> 
> Various proofreading-related changes, including:
> 
>  - punctuation
>  - font changes
>  - rewording for clarity
>  - proper trade names
> 
> Signed-off-by: Robert P. J. Day <rpjday at crashcourse.ca>
> 
> ---
> 
>   hoping this is the right place for this, i'm used to
> proofreading/editing i lay eyes on. currently working my way through
> chapter 2, let me know if i should send that elsewhere.
> 
> 
> Index: doc/manual/en_US/user_Introduction.xml
> ===================================================================
> --- doc/manual/en_US/user_Introduction.xml	(revision 76826)
> +++ doc/manual/en_US/user_Introduction.xml	(working copy)
> @@ -183,7 +183,7 @@
>            <emphasis role="strong">Guest operating system (guest
>            OS).</emphasis> This is the OS that is running inside the
>            virtual machine. Theoretically, &product-name; can run any x86
> -          OS. such as DOS, Windows, OS/2, FreeBSD, and OpenBSD. But to
> +          OS, such as DOS, Windows, OS/2, FreeBSD, and OpenBSD. But to
>            achieve near-native performance of the guest code on your
>            machine, we had to go through a lot of optimizations that are
>            specific to certain OSes. So while your favorite OS
> @@ -203,7 +203,7 @@
>            is the special environment that &product-name; creates for
>            your guest OS while it is running. In other words, you run
>            your guest OS <emphasis>in</emphasis> a VM. Normally, a VM
> -          will be shown as a window on your computer's desktop, but
> +          will be shown as a window on your computer's desktop but,
>            depending on which of the various frontends of &product-name;
>            you use, it can be displayed in full screen mode or remotely
>            on another computer.
> @@ -212,11 +212,11 @@
>          <para>
>            In a more abstract way, internally, &product-name; thinks of a
>            VM as a set of parameters that determine its behavior. They
> -          include hardware settings, such as: how much memory the VM
> +          include hardware settings, such as how much memory the VM
>            should have, what hard disks &product-name; should virtualize
> -          through which container files, what CDs are mounted. They also
> -          include state information, such as: whether the VM is
> -          currently running, saved, if the VM has snapshots. These
> +          through which container files, and what CDs are mounted. They also
> +          include state information, such as whether the VM is
> +          currently running or saved, and if the VM has snapshots. These
>            settings are mirrored in the VirtualBox Manager window, as
>            well as the <command>VBoxManage</command> command. See
>            <xref linkend="vboxmanage" />. In other words, a VM is also
> @@ -254,7 +254,7 @@
>        <listitem>
>          <para>
>            <emphasis role="bold">Portability.</emphasis> &product-name;
> -          runs on a large number of 32-bit and 64-bit host OS. See
> +          runs on a large number of 32-bit and 64-bit host OSes. See
>            <xref
>            linkend="hostossupport" />.
>          </para>
> @@ -324,7 +324,7 @@
>        <listitem>
>          <para>
>            <emphasis role="bold">Great hardware support.</emphasis> Among
> -          others, &product-name; supports the following:
> +          other features, &product-name; supports the following:
>          </para>
> 
>          <itemizedlist>
> @@ -692,7 +692,7 @@
> 
>            <listitem>
>              <para>
> -              Redhat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7
> +              Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7
>              </para>
>            </listitem>
> 
> @@ -1028,10 +1028,10 @@
>          <para>
>            The <emphasis role="bold">Name</emphasis> of the VM will later
>            be shown in the machine list of the VirtualBox Manager window,
> -          and it will be used for the VM's files on disk. Even though
> -          any name can be used, bear in mind that if you create a few
> -          VMs, you will appreciate if you have given your VMs rather
> -          informative names."My VM" would thus be less useful than
> +          and it will be used for that VM's files on disk. Even though
> +          any name can be used, bear in mind that, if you create a few
> +          VMs, you will appreciate if you have given your VMs moderately
> +          descriptive names. "My VM" would thus be less informative than
>            "Windows XP SP2 with OpenOffice", for example.
>          </para>
>        </listitem>
> @@ -1046,7 +1046,7 @@
> 
>        <listitem>
>          <para>
> -          For <emphasis role="bold">Operating System Type</emphasis>
> +          For <emphasis role="bold">Operating System Type</emphasis>,
>            select the OS that you want to install later. The supported
>            OSes are grouped. If you want to install something very
>            unusual that is not listed, select
> @@ -1097,7 +1097,7 @@
>            As a rule of thumb, if you have 1 GB of RAM or more in your
>            host computer, it is usually safe to allocate 512 MB to each
>            VM. In any case, make sure you always have at least 256 to 512
> -          MB of RAM left on your host OS. Otherwise you may cause your
> +          MB of RAM left on your host OS; otherwise, you may cause your
>            host OS to excessively swap out memory to your hard disk,
>            effectively bringing your host system to a standstill.
>          </para>
> @@ -1198,7 +1198,7 @@
>            <listitem>
>              <para>
>                A <emphasis role="bold">dynamically allocated
> -              file</emphasis> will only grow in size when the guest
> +              file</emphasis> will grow in size only when the guest
>                actually stores data on its virtual hard disk. It will
>                therefore initially be small on the host hard drive and
>                only later grow to the size specified as it is filled with
> @@ -1210,7 +1210,7 @@
>              <para>
>                A <emphasis role="bold">fixed-size file</emphasis> will
>                immediately occupy the file specified, even if only a
> -              fraction of the virtual hard disk space is actually in
> +              fraction of that virtual hard disk space is actually in
>                use. While occupying much more space, a fixed-size file
>                incurs less overhead and is therefore slightly faster than
>                a dynamically allocated file.
> @@ -1225,9 +1225,9 @@
>          </para>
> 
>          <para>
> -          To prevent your physical hard disk from running full,
> +          To prevent your physical (host OS) hard disk from filling up,
>            &product-name; limits the size of the image file. Still, it
> -          needs to be large enough to hold the contents of your OS and
> +          needs to be large enough to hold the contents of your guest OS and
>            the applications you want to install. For a modern Windows or
>            Linux guest, you will probably need several gigabytes for any
>            serious use. The limit of the image file size can be changed
> @@ -1410,7 +1410,7 @@
>        </para>
> 
>        <para>
> -        Otherwise, if the virtual machine only sees standard PS/2 mouse
> +        Otherwise, if the virtual machine sees only standard PS/2 mouse
>          and keyboard devices, since the OS in the virtual machine does
>          not know that it is not running on a real computer, it expects
>          to have exclusive control over your keyboard and mouse. But
> @@ -1515,7 +1515,7 @@
>          As this behavior can be inconvenient, &product-name; provides a
>          set of tools and device drivers for guest systems called the
>          &product-name; Guest Additions which make VM keyboard and mouse
> -        operation a lot more seamless. Most importantly, the Additions
> +        operation much more seamless. Most importantly, the Additions
>          will get rid of the second "guest" mouse pointer and make your
>          host mouse pointer work directly in the guest. See
>          <xref linkend="guestadditions" />.
> @@ -1528,12 +1528,12 @@
>        <title>Typing Special Characters</title>
> 
>        <para>
> -        OSes expect certain key combinations to initiate certain
> +        Some OSes expect certain key combinations to initiate certain
>          procedures. Some of these key combinations may be difficult to
>          enter into a virtual machine, as there are three candidates as
>          to who receives keyboard input: the host OS, &product-name;, or
>          the guest OS. Which of these three receives keypresses depends
> -        on a number of factors, including the key itself.
> +        on a number of factors, including the key combination itself.
>        </para>
> 
>        <itemizedlist>
> @@ -1545,9 +1545,9 @@
>              <emphasis role="bold">Ctrl+Alt+Delete</emphasis> combination
>              if you want to reboot the guest OS in your virtual machine,
>              because this key combination is usually hard-wired into the
> -            host OS, both Windows and Linux intercept this, and pressing
> -            this key combination will therefore reboot your
> -            <emphasis>host</emphasis>.
> +            host OS; both Windows and Linux intercept this key combination,
> +            so pressing it will therefore reboot your
> +            <emphasis>host</emphasis> rather than the guest.
>            </para>
> 
>            <para>
> @@ -1567,7 +1567,8 @@
>              combination <emphasis role="bold">Ctrl+Alt+Fx</emphasis>,
>              where Fx is one of the function keys from F1 to F12,
>              normally enables you to switch between virtual terminals. As
> -            with Ctrl+Alt+Delete, these combinations are intercepted by
> +            with <emphasis role="bold">Ctrl+Alt+Delete</emphasis>,
> +            these combinations are intercepted by
>              the host OS and therefore always switch terminals on the
>              <emphasis>host</emphasis>.
>            </para>
> @@ -1587,7 +1588,7 @@
>                  <emphasis role="bold">Keyboard</emphasis> menu of the
>                  virtual machine window. This menu includes the settings
>                  <emphasis role="bold">Insert Ctrl+Alt+Delete</emphasis>
> -                and <emphasis role="bold">Ctrl+Alt+Backspace</emphasis>.
> +                and <emphasis role="bold">Insert Ctrl+Alt+Backspace</emphasis>.
>                  The latter will only have an effect with Linux or Oracle
>                  Solaris guests, however.
>                </para>
> @@ -1611,7 +1612,8 @@
>                  <listitem>
>                    <para>
>                      <emphasis role="bold">Host key + Del</emphasis> to
> -                    send Ctrl+Alt+Del to reboot the guest.
> +                    send <emphasis role="bold">Ctrl+Alt+Del</emphasis>
> +                    to reboot the guest.
>                    </para>
>                  </listitem>
> 
> @@ -1618,7 +1620,8 @@
>                  <listitem>
>                    <para>
>                      <emphasis role="bold">Host key +
> -                    Backspace</emphasis> to send Ctrl+Alt+Backspace to
> +                    Backspace</emphasis> to send
> +                    <emphasis role="bold">Ctrl+Alt+Backspace</emphasis> to
>                      restart the graphical user interface of a Linux or
>                      Oracle Solaris guest.
>                    </para>
> @@ -1627,7 +1630,8 @@
>                  <listitem>
>                    <para>
>                      <emphasis role="bold">Host key + Function
> -                    key</emphasis>. For example, to simulate Ctrl+Alt+Fx
> +                    key</emphasis>. For example, to simulate
> +                    <emphasis role="bold">Ctrl+Alt+Fx</emphasis>
>                      to switch between virtual terminals in a Linux
>                      guest.
>                    </para>
> @@ -1699,8 +1703,8 @@
>        <title>Resizing the Machine's Window</title>
> 
>        <para>
> -        You can resize the virtual machine's window when it is running.
> -        In that case, one of the following things will happen:
> +        You can resize a virtual machine's window while that VM is running.
> +        If you do, one of the following things will happen:
>        </para>
> 
>        <orderedlist>
> @@ -2282,7 +2286,7 @@
> 
>            <para>
>              The memory state file can be as large as the memory size of
> -            the virtual machine and will therefore occupy quite some
> +            the virtual machine and will therefore occupy considerable
>              disk space as well.
>            </para>
>          </listitem>
> @@ -2766,7 +2770,7 @@
>                <para>
>                  <emphasis role="bold">Import Hard Drives as
>                  VDI:</emphasis> Imports hard drives in the VDI format
> -                rather that in the defalut VMDK format.
> +                rather than in the default VMDK format.
>                </para>
>              </listitem>
> 
> 
> rday
> 

-- 
Michael Thayer | VirtualBox engineer
ORACLE Deutschland B.V. & Co. KG | Werkstr. 24 | D-71384 Weinstadt

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